The Tide of History – Part II

by williamschack

It was one of the most emotional days in football history. Not since the late, great, Teddy Whitten did his final lap of honour in 1995 has there been such a communal outpouring of emotion and goodwill. Back then, it was for one Bulldogs’ individual. This time, it was for the entire Bulldogs’ community. We have not seen a day like it. There are so many elements which make this premiership one of the greatest football stories ever – perhaps the greatest. Below are four moments of that premiership story.

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All day both teams had been wrestling the lead away from each other, trying to make the most of the momentum when they had it. In hindsight, the Dogs had control most of the day, except for about 10 minutes in the 2nd quarter when the Swans kicked four unanswered goals and Josh Kennedy looked unstoppable. A closer marking of him in the 2nd half by Tom Liberatore would prove to be crucial in the Dogs’ eventual victory.
Despite the Dogs’ control, the margin was never more than a few kicks, and with 8 minutes remaining in the game the margin was 1 point.
Tom Papley marked the ball on the back flank and looked up forward for his options. He hesitated for a bit before electing to kick it down the line. It was smothered by Shane Biggs who gathered the ball, tried to move it forward, but was tackled and the ball fell free to Jake Lloyd. He looked to handpass to a free Swans player but the ball was smothered again by Biggs, who was thrown over the boundary line only seconds earlier. A series of handballs, from the most handball happy team since Geelong, moved the ball deeper inside 50 for the Dogs.
The Swans resisted gallantly. First Cordy shot for goal, but he was bumped off the ball as he kicked it. The ball tumbled towards Boyd who kicked for goal, but the ball ricocheted off the back of Jake Stringer to the pocket. Biggs collected the ball again but was immediately tackled. The ball spilled free to Mills who handpassed errantly to Dunkley, who immediately passed it to Macrae.
It was as intense as football gets. No player had more than split second to gather the ball and decide what to do. The Dogs were surging forward in waves, but the Swans were holding on.
Macrae kicked the ball to McLean so quickly it seemed like he did not hold the ball. McLean tried to mark but it was spoiled. It fell over the top. Liam Picken – player of the series, whose father lost 4 Grand Finals – gathered the ball. For once a player had some space. Picken steadied himself and shot for goal. As it went up in the air the Bulldogs fans behind the goals rose. They watched it go through the middle and they felt as though the game might be turning. They felt that Sydney’s resistance might be about to crack.

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The football world was robbed of a great moment when Norm Smith winner, Jason Johannisen’s, goal was overturned. There was once a time when such a moment would turn the game against the Bulldogs. In 1997 a potential goal was called a point, and the Dogs had no opportunity for it to be reviewed. But the Bulldogs in 2016 were different to all those that had gone before them.
Between the flank and wing Josh Kennedy passed the ball to Lance Franklin, who was quiet for most of the day but played a brilliant last quarter. Franklin looked forward and threatened to run through the middle of the MCG like he has done so many times before. But coming behind him was Dale Morris – a Bulldogs veteran who had played with two broken vertebrae since round 23 – and he tackled Franklin, brought him to the ground, and dispossessed him of the ball. It fell free to a lonesome Tom Boyd, who was born on the same day as Ted Whitten’s state funeral and joined the club at the nadir of Peter Gordon’s second presidential stint. He gathered the ball, turned towards goal and kicked from inside the centre square. It bounced in the forward square and went up in the air. There were fans of another 1 premiership team watching who knew how important such a bounce could be. The ball went up and then it went forward and over the line. It was a goal. To quote Dennis Cometti, the western suburbs erupted.

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And anything from there was gravy. There would be dogs fans who would never dare celebrate until the siren, such is their tortured history, but the game was won. I’ve always been a fan of Grand Finals where one team kicks away in the last 10 minutes or so. It gives the fans and players the chance to really enjoy the moment. With only two and a half minutes to go Jake Stringer, had the chance to give the Dogs one last goal before the siren. He ran forward along the boundary line, diagonally across the field from where he ran in the last minute the week before. Similarly to the preliminary final, you could not begrudge Stringer if he had the shot, so enticing would the glory have been had it gone through. But just like the week before, Stringer centred the ball, this time to Picken. Picken’s mark was spoiled but he stood firm. The ball fell down in front of him. He ran into an open goal and booted the longest premiership drought in football into oblivion.

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Earlier in the year I wrote a post titled ‘Footy Is Not Fair’. In that article I expressed my sadness that if a player was holding a cup on the premiership dais in the tri-colours in 2016 it would not be Bob Murphy. But I had underestimated the selflessness of Luke Beveridge. After he had delivered a somewhat restrained and understated speech he asked for the injured captain to come up onto the dais to accept his Jock McHale medal, because ‘no one deserved it more’. Craig Willis then called on John Schulz to present the premiership cup to Luke Beveridge, Easton Wood, and Bob Murphy. Beveridge let Murphy and Wood hold the cup in the air and every Bulldogs fan in the world roared with joy. 62 years of pain and misery was washed away. And Luke Beveridge stood in the background with a smile on his face, gently clapping. The tide of history had finally turned in the Bulldogs’ favour.

 

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